, Alerte et action au niveau mondial -Lait maternisé en poudre contaminé à la mélamine en Chine, 2008.

K. Ortmayr, V. Charwat, C. Kasper, S. Hann, and G. Koellensperger, Uncertainty budgeting in fold change determination and implications for non-targeted metabolomics studies in model systems, The Analyst, vol.142, issue.1, pp.80-90, 2017.

P. Pérez-ortega, F. J. Lara-ortega, J. F. García-reyes, B. Gilbert-lópez, M. Trojanowicz et al., A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food, Talanta, vol.160, pp.704-712, 2016.

T. Pluskal, S. Castillo, A. Villar-briones, and M. Ore?i?, MZmine 2: Modular framework for processing, visualizing, and analyzing mass spectrometry-based molecular profile data, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.11, p.395, 2010.

W. Pongsuwan, T. Bamba, K. Harada, T. Yonetani, A. Kobayashi et al., Highthroughput technique for comprehensive analysis of Japanese green tea quality assessment using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOF MS), Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.56, issue.22, pp.10705-10708, 2008.

J. Riedl, S. Esslinger, and C. Hassek, Review of validation and reporting of non-targeted fingerprinting approaches for food authentication, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.885, pp.17-32, 2015.

D. Rondeau, Spectrométrie de masse organique Analyseurs et méthodes en tandem ou MS n, 2017.

C. Roullier, Y. Guitton, M. Valery, S. Amand, S. Prado et al., Automated Detection of Natural Halogenated Compounds from LC-MS ProfilesApplication to the Isolation of Bioactive Chlorinated Compounds from Marine-Derived Fungi, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.18, pp.9143-9150, 2016.

S. Saito-shida, T. Hamasaka, S. Nemoto, and H. Akiyama, Multiresidue determination of pesticides in tea by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry: Comparison between Orbitrap and time-of-flight mass analyzers, Food Chemistry, vol.256, pp.140-148, 2017.

R. M. Salek, K. Haug, and C. Steinbeck, Dissemination of metabolomics results: Role of MetaboLights and COSMOS, vol.2, 2013.

A. Samsidar, S. Siddiquee, and S. M. Shaarani, A review of extraction, analytical and advanced methods for determination of pesticides in environment and foodstuffs, Trends in Food Science and Technology, vol.71, pp.188-201, 2017.

S. Canada, Les composés perfluorés dans les aliments, 2009.

S. Canada, Les glyco-alcaloïdes dans les aliments, 2011.

M. Scholz, S. Gatzek, A. Sterling, O. Fiehn, and J. Selbig, Metabolite fingerprinting: Detecting biological features by independent component analysis, Bioinformatics, vol.20, issue.15, pp.2447-2454, 2004.

M. Scigelova and A. Makarov, Fundamentals and Advances of Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry, Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry, pp.1-36, 2013.

T. Seppänen-laakso, I. Laakso, and R. Hiltunen, Analysis of fatty acids by gas chromatography, Chapitre 1 -Contexte, état de l'art et méthodologie 71 and its relevance to research on health and nutrition, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.465, issue.1-2, pp.39-62, 2002.

C. A. Smith, E. J. Want, G. O'maille, R. Abagyan, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS: Processing mass spectrometry data for metabolite profiling using nonlinear peak alignment, matching, and identification, Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.3, pp.779-787, 2006.

L. W. Sumner, A. Amberg, D. Barrett, M. H. Beale, R. Beger et al., Proposed minimum reporting standards for chemical analysis: Chemical Analysis Working Group (CAWG) Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), Metabolomics, vol.3, issue.3, pp.211-221, 2007.

R. Tautenhahn, C. Bottcher, and S. Neumann, Highly sensitive feature detection for high resolution LC/MS, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.9, p.16, 2008.

R. Tautenhahn, G. J. Patti, D. Rinehart, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS online: A web-based platform to process untargeted metabolomic data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.84, issue.11, pp.5035-5039, 2012.

E. Tengstrand, J. Lindberg, and K. M. Åberg, TracMass 2-A modular suite of tools for processing chromatography-full scan mass spectrometry data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.86, issue.7, pp.3435-3442, 2014.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosén, K. E. Hellenäs, and K. M. Åberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

J. Tranchant, Chromatographie en phase gazeuse, pp.98018-98023, 1996.

F. Tsopelas, D. Konstantopoulos, and A. T. Kakoulidou, Voltammetric fingerprinting of oils and its combination with chemometrics for the detection of extra virgin olive oil adulteration, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.1015, pp.8-19, 2018.

, Types of tea, UK Tea & Infusions Association, 2018.

J. Wang, W. Cheung, and D. Leung, Determination of pesticide residue transfer rates (Percent) from dried tea leaves to brewed tea, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.4, pp.966-983, 2014.

R. Wehrens, J. A. Hageman, F. Van-eeuwijk, R. Kooke, P. J. Flood et al., Improved batch correction in untargeted MS-based metabolomics, Metabolomics, vol.12, issue.5, 2016.

R. Wei, J. Wang, M. Su, E. Jia, S. Chen et al., Missing Value Imputation Approach for Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics Data, Scientific Reports, vol.8, issue.1, 2018.

. Who/unep, All POPs listed in the Stockholm Convention, 2008.

J. Antignac, F. Courant, G. Pinel, E. Bichon, F. Monteau et al., Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics applied to the chemical safety of food, Trac-Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.30, issue.2, pp.292-301, 2011.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01928687

M. Castro-puyana and M. Herrero, Metabolomics approaches based on mass spectrometry for food safety, quality and traceability, TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.52, pp.74-87, 2013.

G. , Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes 92

M. C. Chambers, B. Maclean, R. Burke, D. Amodei, D. L. Ruderman et al., A cross-platform toolkit for mass spectrometry and proteomics, Nature Biotechnology, vol.30, issue.10, pp.918-920, 2012.

K. Chang, World tea production and trade. Current and future development, p.17, 2015.

J. Cotton, F. Leroux, S. Broudin, M. Marie, B. Corman et al., HighResolution Mass Spectrometry Associated with Data Mining Tools for the Detection of Pollutants and Chemical Characterization of Honey Samples, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.46, pp.11335-11345, 2014.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01664193

L. A. Currie, Nomenclature in evaluation of analytical methods including detection and quantification capabilities (IUPAC Recommendations 1995), Pure and Applied Chemistry, vol.67, issue.10, pp.1699-1723, 1995.

G. P. Danezis, C. J. Anagnostopoulos, K. Liapis, and M. A. Koupparis, Multi-residue analysis of pesticides, plant hormones, veterinary drugs and mycotoxins using HILIC chromatography -MS/MS in various food matrices, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.942, pp.121-138, 2016.

H. Dong and K. Xiao, Modified QuEChERS combined with ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to determine seven biogenic amines in Chinese traditional condiment soy sauce, Food Chemistry, vol.229, pp.502-508, 2017.

,

Z. Dzuman, M. Zachariasova, Z. Veprikova, M. Godula, and J. Hajslova, Multi-analyte high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry method for control of pesticide residues, mycotoxins, and pyrrolizidine alkaloids, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.863, pp.29-40, 2015.

. Efsa, Chemicals in food 2016: Overview of selected data collection, p.40, 2016.

B. D. Eitzer, W. Hammack, and M. Filigenzi, Interlaboratory Comparison of a General Method To Screen Foods for Pesticides Using QuEChERs Extraction with High Performance Liquid Chromatography and High Resolution Mass Spectrometry, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.1, pp.80-87, 2014.

, Regulation (EC) No. 396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the council of 23 February 2005 on maximum residue levels of pesticides in or on food and feed of plant and animal origin and amending Council Directive 91/414/EC, Official Journal of the European Union §, vol.70, 2005.

, setting maximum levels for certain contaminants in foodstuffs, Official Journal of the European Union §, vol.364, 2006.

, Guidance document on analytical quality control and method validation procedures for pesticides residues analysis in food and feed, 2015.

F. Giacomoni, G. Le-corguille, M. Monsoor, M. Landi, P. Pericard et al., Workflow4Metabolomics: a collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics, vol.31, pp.1493-1495, 2015.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01214152

X. Hou, S. Lei, S. Qiu, L. Guo, S. Yi et al., A multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in tea using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a dispersive solid phase extraction absorbent, Food Chemistry, vol.153, pp.121-129, 2014.

, ISO 3103:1980 -Tea --Preparation of liquor for use in sensory tests, p.4, 1980.

Y. Jin, J. Zhang, W. Zhao, W. Zhang, L. Wang et al., Development and validation of a multiclass method for the quantification of veterinary drug residues in honey and Chapitre 2 -Développement de l'approche ciblée multi, p.93, 2017.

, royal jelly by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.221, pp.1298-1307

P. Kaczy?ski, B. ?ozowicka, M. Perkowski, and J. Szabu?ko, Multiclass pesticide residue analysis in fish muscle and liver on one-step extraction-cleanup strategy coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol.138, pp.179-189, 2017.

A. Klupczynska, P. Derezi?ski, T. J. Garrett, V. Y. Rubio, W. Dyszkiewicz et al., Study of early stage non-small-cell lung cancer using Orbitrap-based global serum metabolomics, Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, vol.143, issue.4, pp.649-659, 2017.

A. Mena-bravo, F. Priego-capote, and M. D. Luque-de-castro, Two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for vitamin D metabolite profiling including the C3-epimer-25-monohydroxyvitamin D3, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1451, pp.50-57, 2016.

H. G. Mol, S. L. Reynolds, R. J. Fussell, and D. ?tajnbaher, Guidelines for the validation of qualitative multi-residue methods used to detect pesticides in food, Drug Testing and Analysis, vol.4, issue.S1, pp.10-16, 2012.

H. G. Mol, P. Plaza-bolaños, P. Zomer, T. C. De-rijk, A. A. Stolker et al., Toward a Generic Extraction Method for Simultaneous Determination of Pesticides, Mycotoxins, Plant Toxins, and Veterinary Drugs in Feed and Food Matrixes, Analytical Chemistry, vol.80, issue.24, pp.9450-9459, 2008.

P. Pérez-ortega, F. J. Lara-ortega, J. F. García-reyes, B. Gilbert-lópez, M. Trojanowicz et al., A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food, Talanta, vol.160, pp.704-712, 2016.

M. H. Petrarca, J. O. Fernandes, H. T. Godoy, and S. C. Cunha, Multiclass pesticide analysis in fruit-based baby food: A comparative study of sample preparation techniques previous to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.212, pp.528-536, 2016.

,

T. Pluskal, S. Castillo, A. Villar-briones, and M. Oresic, MZmine 2: Modular framework for processing, visualizing, and analyzing mass spectrometry-based molecular profile data, Bmc Bioinformatics, vol.11, p.395, 2010.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosen, K. Hellenas, and K. M. Aberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

M. Thompson, S. L. Ellison, and R. Wood, Harmonized guidelines for single-laboratory validation of methods of analysis (IUPAC Technical Report), Pure and Applied Chemistry, vol.74, issue.5, pp.835-855, 2002.

A. D. Troise, A. Fiore, and V. Fogliano, Quantitation of Acrylamide in Foods by HighResolution Mass Spectrometry, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.1, pp.74-79, 2014.

F. M. Van-der-kloet, I. Bobeldijk, E. R. Verheij, and R. H. Jellema, Analytical Error Reduction Using Single Point Calibration for Accurate and Precise Metabolomic Phenotyping, Journal of Proteome Research, vol.8, issue.11, pp.5132-5141, 2009.

A. Zgair, J. C. Wong, A. Sabri, P. M. Fischer, D. A. Barrett et al., Development of a simple and sensitive HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of cannabidiol and ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol in rat plasma, 2015.

J. P. Antignac, F. Courant, G. Pinel, E. Bichon, F. Monteau et al., Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics applied to the chemical safety of food, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.30, issue.2, pp.292-301, 2011.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01928687

M. Castro-puyana, R. Pérez-míguez, L. Montero, and M. Herrero, Application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approaches for food safety, quality and traceability, TrACTrends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.93, pp.102-118, 2017.

M. C. Chambers, B. Maclean, R. Burke, D. Amodei, D. L. Ruderman et al., A cross-platform toolkit for mass spectrometry and proteomics, Nature Biotechnology, vol.30, issue.10, pp.918-920, 2012.

K. Chang, World tea production and trade Current and future development. Food and Agriculture Organisation, 2015.

A. Cifuentes, Food analysis and foodomics, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1216, issue.43, 2009.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01564474

M. Cladière, G. Delaporte, E. Le-roux, and V. Camel, Multi-class analysis for simultaneous determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, process-induced toxicants and packaging contaminants in tea, Food Chemistry, vol.242, pp.113-121, 2018.

J. B. Coble and C. G. Fraga, Comparative evaluation of preprocessing freeware on chromatography/mass spectrometry data for signature discovery, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1358, pp.155-164, 2014.

J. Cotton, F. Leroux, S. Broudin, M. Marie, B. Corman et al., Highresolution mass spectrometry associated with data mining tools for the detection of pollutants and chemical characterization of honey samples, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.46, pp.11335-11345, 2014.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01664193

F. Dieterle, A. Ross, G. Schlotterbeck, and H. Senn, Probabilistic quotient normalization as robust method to account for dilution of complex biological mixtures. Application in1H NMR metabonomics, Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.13, pp.4281-4290, 2006.

, Guidance document on analytical quality control and method validation procedures for pesticides residues analysis in food and feed, 2015.

K. Fraser, G. A. Lane, D. E. Otter, Y. Hemar, S. Y. Quek et al., Analysis of metabolic markers of tea origin by UHPLC and high resolution mass spectrometry, Food Research International, vol.53, issue.2, pp.827-835, 2013.

H. Gallart-ayala, O. Núñez, and P. Lucci, Recent advances in LC-MS analysis of foodpackaging contaminants, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.42, pp.186-204, 2013.

F. Giacomoni, G. Le-corguillé, M. Monsoor, M. Landi, P. Pericard et al., Workflow4Metabolomics: A collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics, vol.31, pp.1493-1495, 2015.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01214152

H. G. Gika, G. A. Theodoridis, R. S. Plumb, and I. D. Wilson, Current practice of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolomics and metabonomics, Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, vol.87, pp.12-25, 2014.

M. M. Gómez-ramos, A. I. García-valcárcel, J. L. Tadeo, A. R. Fernández-alba, and M. D. Hernando, , 2016.

G. Delaporte, Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes 118 chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol.23, pp.4609-4620

F. Gosetti, E. Mazzucco, M. C. Gennaro, and E. Marengo, Contaminants in water: non-target UHPLC/MS analysis, Environmental Chemistry Letters, vol.14, issue.1, pp.51-65, 2016.

,

K. Haug, R. M. Salek, P. Conesa, J. Hastings, P. De-matos et al., , 2013.

, MetaboLights -An open-access general-purpose repository for metabolomics studies and associated meta-data, Nucleic Acids Research, vol.41, issue.D1, pp.781-786

,

K. Inoue, C. Tanada, T. Sakamoto, H. Tsutsui, T. Akiba et al., Metabolomics approach of infant formula for the evaluation of contamination and degradation using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.181, pp.318-324, 2015.

A. Kassouf, . Jouan-rimbaud, D. Bouveresse, and D. N. Rutledge, Determination of the Optimal Number of Components in Independent Components Analysis, Talanta, vol.179, pp.538-545, 2017.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01757714

A. M. Knolhoff and T. R. Croley, Non-targeted screening approaches for contaminants and adulterants in food using liquid chromatography hyphenated to high resolution mass spectrometry, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1428, pp.86-96, 2016.

A. M. Knolhoff, J. A. Zweigenbaum, and T. R. Croley, Nontargeted Screening of Food Matrices: Development of a Chemometric Software Strategy to Identify Unknowns in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.7, 2016.

M. Kunzelmann, M. Winter, M. Åberg, K. Hellenäs, and J. Rosén, Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, pp.1-10, 2018.

S. J. Lehotay, Y. Sapozhnikova, and H. G. Mol, Current issues involving screening and identification of chemical contaminants in foods by mass spectrometry, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.69, pp.62-75, 2015.

K. A. Lewis, J. Tzilivakis, D. J. Warner, and A. Green, An international database for pesticide risk assessments and management, Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, vol.22, issue.4, pp.1050-1064, 2016.

G. Libiseller, M. Dvorzak, U. Kleb, E. Gander, T. Eisenberg et al., IPO: a tool for automated optimization of XCMS parameters, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.16, issue.1, 2015.

Y. Liu, K. Smirnov, M. Lucio, R. D. Gougeon, H. Alexandre et al., MetICA: Independent component analysis for high-resolution mass-spectrometry based nontargeted metabolomics, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.17, issue.1, 2016.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01430376

K. F. Nielsen and J. Smedsgaard, Fungal metabolite screening: Database of 474 mycotoxins and fungal metabolites for dereplication by standardised liquid chromatography-UV-mass spectrometry methodology, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1002, issue.1-2, pp.111-136, 2003.

I. Ortea, A. Pascoal, B. Cañas, J. M. Gallardo, J. Barros-velázquez et al., Food authentication of commercially-relevant shrimp and prawn species: From classical methods to Foodomics, 2012.

, Chapitre 3 -Développement de l'approche non-ciblée 119

K. Ortmayr, V. Charwat, C. Kasper, S. Hann, and G. Koellensperger, Uncertainty budgeting in fold change determination and implications for non-targeted metabolomics studies in model systems, The Analyst, vol.142, issue.1, pp.80-90, 2017.

G. J. Patti, R. Tautenhahn, and G. Siuzdak, Meta-Analysis of Untargeted Metabolomic Data: Combining Results from Multiple Profiling Experiments, Nature Protocols, vol.7, issue.3, pp.508-516, 2013.

W. Pongsuwan, T. Bamba, K. Harada, T. Yonetani, A. Kobayashi et al., Highthroughput technique for comprehensive analysis of Japanese green tea quality assessment using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOF MS), Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.56, issue.22, pp.10705-10708, 2008.

J. Rubert, L. Righetti, M. Stranska-zachariasova, Z. Dzuman, J. Chrpova et al., Untargeted metabolomics based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatographyhigh-resolution mass spectrometry merged with chemometrics: A new predictable tool for an early detection of mycotoxins, Food Chemistry, vol.224, pp.423-431, 2017.

,

D. N. Rutledge and D. Jouan-rimbaud-bouveresse, Corrigendum to "Independent Components Analysis with the JADE algorithm, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.67, 2015.

C. A. Smith, E. J. Want, G. O'maille, R. Abagyan, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS: Processing mass spectrometry data for metabolite profiling using nonlinear peak alignment, matching, and identification, Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.3, pp.779-787, 2006.

L. W. Sumner, A. Amberg, D. Barrett, M. H. Beale, R. Beger et al., Proposed minimum reporting standards for chemical analysis: Chemical Analysis Working Group (CAWG) Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), Metabolomics, vol.3, issue.3, pp.211-221, 2007.

R. Tautenhahn, C. Bottcher, and S. Neumann, Highly sensitive feature detection for high resolution LC/MS, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.9, p.16, 2008.

R. Tautenhahn, G. J. Patti, D. Rinehart, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS online: A web-based platform to process untargeted metabolomic data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.84, issue.11, pp.5035-5039, 2012.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosén, K. E. Hellenäs, and K. M. Åberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

E. A. Thévenot, A. Roux, Y. Xu, E. Ezan, and C. Junot, Analysis of the Human Adult Urinary Metabolome Variations with Age, Body Mass Index, and Gender by Implementing a Comprehensive Workflow for Univariate and OPLS Statistical Analyses, Journal of Proteome Research, vol.14, issue.8, pp.3322-3335, 2015.

R. Wehrens, J. A. Hageman, F. Van-eeuwijk, R. Kooke, P. J. Flood et al., Improved batch correction in untargeted MS-based metabolomics, Metabolomics, vol.12, issue.5, 2016.

D. Wishart, D. Arndt, A. Pon, T. Sajed, A. C. Guo et al., T3DB: The toxic exposome database, Nucleic Acids Research, vol.43, issue.D1, pp.928-934, 2015.

G. , Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes

J. P. Antignac, F. Courant, G. Pinel, E. Bichon, F. Monteau et al., Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics applied to the chemical safety of food, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.30, issue.2, pp.292-301, 2011.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01928687

E. G. Armitage, J. Godzien, V. Alonso-herranz, Á. López-gonzálvez, and C. Barbas, Missing value imputation strategies for metabolomics data, Electrophoresis, vol.36, pp.3050-3060, 2015.

I. B. Aydilek and A. Arslan, A hybrid method for imputation of missing values using optimized fuzzy cmeans with support vector regression and a genetic algorithm, Inf. Sci. (Ny), vol.233, pp.25-35, 2013.

,

M. Castro-puyana, R. Pérez-míguez, L. Montero, and M. Herrero, Application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approaches for food safety, quality and traceability, TrACTrends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.93, pp.102-118, 2017.

M. C. Chambers, B. Maclean, R. Burke, D. Amodei, D. L. Ruderman et al., A cross-platform toolkit for mass spectrometry and proteomics, Nature Biotechnology, vol.30, issue.10, pp.918-920, 2012.

M. Cladière, G. Delaporte, E. Le-roux, and V. Camel, Multi-class analysis for simultaneous determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, process-induced toxicants and packaging contaminants in tea, Food Chemistry, vol.242, pp.113-121, 2018.

J. Cotton, F. Leroux, S. Broudin, M. Marie, B. Corman et al., Highresolution mass spectrometry associated with data mining tools for the detection of pollutants and chemical characterization of honey samples, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.46, pp.11335-11345, 2014.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01664193

G. Delaporte, M. Cladière, . Jouan-rimbaud, D. Bouveresse, and V. Camel, Untargeted food contaminant detection using UHPLC-HRMS combined with multivariate analysis: feasibility study on tea, Food Chemistry, 2019.

G. Delaporte, M. Cladière, and V. Camel, Untargeted food chemical safety assessment : A proof-ofconcept on two analytical platforms and contamination scenarios of tea, Food Control, vol.98, pp.510-519, 2019.

R. Di-guida, J. Engel, J. W. Allwood, R. J. Weber, M. R. Jones et al., Non-targeted UHPLC-MS metabolomic data processing methods: a comparative investigation of normalisation, MV imputation, transformation and scaling, Metabolomics, issue.5, p.12, 2016.

W. B. Dunn, W. Lin, D. Broadhurst, P. Begley, M. Brown et al., Molecular phenotyping of a UK population: defining the human serum metabolome, 2014.

, Metabolomics, vol.11, issue.1, pp.9-26

P. Franceschi, D. Masuero, U. Vrhovsek, F. Mattivi, and R. Wehrens, A benchmark spike-in data set for biomarker identification in metabolomics, Journal of Chemometrics, vol.26, issue.1, pp.16-24, 2012.

F. Giacomoni, G. Le-corguillé, M. Monsoor, M. Landi, P. Pericard et al., Workflow4Metabolomics: A collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics, vol.31, pp.1493-1495, 2015.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01214152

K. Haug, R. M. Salek, P. Conesa, J. Hastings, P. De-matos et al., , 2013.

, MetaboLights -An open-access general-purpose repository for metabolomics studies and associated meta-data, Nucleic Acids Research, vol.41, issue.D1, pp.781-786

,

O. Hrydziuszko and M. R. Viant, MVs in mass spectrometry based metabolomics: An undervalued step in the data processing pipeline, Metabolomics, vol.8, pp.161-174, 2012.

A. M. Knolhoff and T. R. Croley, Non-targeted screening approaches for contaminants and adulterants in food using liquid chromatography hyphenated to high resolution mass spectrometry, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1428, pp.86-96, 2016.

A. M. Knolhoff, J. A. Zweigenbaum, and T. R. Croley, Nontargeted Screening of Food Matrices: Development of a Chemometric Software Strategy to Identify Unknowns in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.7, 2016.

M. Kunzelmann, M. Winter, M. Åberg, K. Hellenäs, and J. Rosén, Non-targeted analysis of G.Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes 148 unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, pp.1-10, 2018.

C. Lazar, imputeLCMD: A collection of methods for left-censored missing data imputation v.2.0, 2015.

C. Lazar, L. Gatto, M. Ferro, C. Bruley, and T. Burger, Accounting for the Multiple Natures of MVs in Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Data Sets to Compare Imputation Strategies, Journal of Proteome Research, vol.15, issue.4, pp.1116-1125, 2016.

G. Libiseller, M. Dvorzak, U. Kleb, E. Gander, T. Eisenberg et al., IPO: a tool for automated optimization of XCMS parameters, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.16, issue.1, 2015.

K. Ortmayr, V. Charwat, C. Kasper, S. Hann, and G. Koellensperger, Uncertainty budgeting in fold change determination and implications for non-targeted metabolomics studies in model systems, The Analyst, vol.142, issue.1, pp.80-90, 2017.

C. Roullier, Y. Guitton, M. Valery, S. Amand, S. Prado et al., Automated Detection of Natural Halogenated Compounds from LC-MS ProfilesApplication to the Isolation of Bioactive Chlorinated Compounds from Marine-Derived Fungi, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.18, pp.9143-9150, 2016.

D. N. Rutledge and D. Jouan-rimbaud-bouveresse, Corrigendum to "Independent Components Analysis with the JADE algorithm, Analytical Chemistry, vol.50, pp.22-32, 2013.

, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.67

C. A. Smith, E. J. Want, G. O'maille, R. Abagyan, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS: Processing mass spectrometry data for metabolite profiling using nonlinear peak alignment, matching, and identification, Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.3, pp.779-787, 2006.

W. Stacklies, H. Redestig, M. Scholz, D. Walther, and J. Selbig, pcaMethods -A bioconductor package providing PCA methods for incomplete data, Bioinformatics, vol.23, issue.9, pp.1164-1167, 2007.

R. Tautenhahn, C. Bottcher, and S. Neumann, Highly sensitive feature detection for high resolution LC/MS, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.9, p.16, 2008.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosén, K. E. Hellenäs, and K. M. Åberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

E. A. Thévenot, A. Roux, Y. Xu, E. Ezan, and C. Junot, Analysis of the Human Adult Urinary Metabolome Variations with Age, Body Mass Index, and Gender by Implementing a Comprehensive Workflow for Univariate and OPLS Statistical Analyses, Journal of Proteome Research, vol.14, issue.8, pp.3322-3335, 2015.

R. Wei, J. Wang, M. Su, E. Jia, S. Chen et al., MV Imputation Approach for Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics Data, Scientific Reports, vol.8, issue.1, 2018.

J. P. Antignac, F. Courant, G. Pinel, E. Bichon, F. Monteau et al., Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics applied to the chemical safety of food, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.30, issue.2, pp.292-301, 2011.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01928687

M. Castro-puyana and M. Herrero, Metabolomics approaches based on mass spectrometry for food safety, quality and traceability, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.52, pp.74-87, 2013.

M. Castro-puyana, R. Pérez-míguez, L. Montero, and M. Herrero, Application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approaches for food safety, quality and traceability, TrACTrends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.93, pp.102-118, 2017.

M. C. Chambers, B. Maclean, R. Burke, D. Amodei, D. L. Ruderman et al., A cross-platform toolkit for mass spectrometry and proteomics, Nature Biotechnology, vol.30, issue.10, pp.918-920, 2012.

M. Cladière, G. Delaporte, E. Le-roux, and V. Camel, Multi-class analysis for simultaneous determination of pesticides, mycotoxins, process-induced toxicants and packaging contaminants in tea, Food Chemistry, vol.242, pp.113-121, 2018.

J. Cotton, F. Leroux, S. Broudin, M. Marie, B. Corman et al., Highresolution mass spectrometry associated with data mining tools for the detection of pollutants and chemical characterization of honey samples, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.46, pp.11335-11345, 2014.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01664193

G. Delaporte, M. Cladière, and V. Camel, Missing value imputation and data cleaning in untargeted food chemical safety assessment by LC-HRMS, 2018.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02154537

G. Delaporte, M. Cladière, . Jouan-rimbaud, D. Bouveresse, and V. Camel, Untargeted food contaminant detection using UHPLC-HRMS combined with multivariate analysis: feasibility study on tea, Food Chemistry, vol.277, pp.54-62, 2019.

F. Dieterle, A. Ross, G. Schlotterbeck, and H. Senn, Probabilistic quotient normalization as robust method to account for dilution of complex biological mixtures, 2006.

G. , Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes 180

, metabonomics. Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.13, pp.4281-4290

W. B. Dunn, D. Broadhurst, P. Begley, E. Zelena, S. Francis-mcintyre et al., Procedures for large-scale metabolic profiling of serum and plasma using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, Nature Protocols, vol.6, pp.1060-1083, 2011.

F. Giacomoni, G. Le-corguillé, M. Monsoor, M. Landi, P. Pericard et al., Workflow4Metabolomics: A collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics, vol.31, pp.1493-1495, 2015.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01214152

G. Glauser, N. Veyrat, B. Rochat, J. L. Wolfender, and T. C. Turlings, Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for plant metabolomics: A systematic comparison of high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight and single stage Orbitrap mass spectrometers, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1292, pp.151-159, 2013.

E. Gorrochategui, J. Jaumot, S. Lacorte, and R. Tauler, Data analysis strategies for targeted and untargeted LC-MS metabolomic studies: Overview and workflow, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.82, pp.425-442, 2016.

K. Haug, R. M. Salek, P. Conesa, J. Hastings, P. De-matos et al., , 2013.

, MetaboLights -An open-access general-purpose repository for metabolomics studies and associated meta-data, Nucleic Acids Research, vol.41, issue.D1, pp.781-786

K. Inoue, C. Tanada, T. Sakamoto, H. Tsutsui, T. Akiba et al., Metabolomics approach of infant formula for the evaluation of contamination and degradation using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.181, pp.318-324, 2015.

A. Kassouf, . Jouan-rimbaud, D. Bouveresse, and D. N. Rutledge, Determination of the Optimal Number of Components in Independent Components Analysis, Talanta, vol.179, pp.538-545, 2017.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01757714

A. M. Knolhoff and T. R. Croley, Non-targeted screening approaches for contaminants and adulterants in food using liquid chromatography hyphenated to high resolution mass spectrometry, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1428, pp.86-96, 2016.

A. M. Knolhoff, J. A. Zweigenbaum, and T. R. Croley, Nontargeted Screening of Food Matrices: Development of a Chemometric Software Strategy to Identify Unknowns in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.7, 2016.

M. Kunzelmann, M. Winter, M. Åberg, K. Hellenäs, and J. Rosén, Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, pp.1-10, 2018.

G. Libiseller, M. Dvorzak, U. Kleb, E. Gander, T. Eisenberg et al., IPO: a tool for automated optimization of XCMS parameters, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.16, issue.1, 2015.

H. Liu, C. Ding, S. Zhang, H. Liu, X. Liao et al., Simultaneous residue measurement of pendimethalin, isopropalin, and butralin in tobacco using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric identification, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.52, pp.6912-6915, 2004.

A. Lommen, G. Van-der-weg, M. C. Van-engelen, G. Bor, L. A. Hoogenboom et al., An untargeted metabolomics approach to contaminant analysis: Pinpointing potential unknown compounds, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.584, issue.1, pp.43-49, 2007.

,

G. Martínez-domínguez, A. J. Nieto-garcía, R. Romero-gonzález, and A. G. Frenich, spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.177, pp.182-190, 2015.

B. Mayer-helm, L. Hofbauer, and J. Müller, Development of a multi-residue method for the determination of 18 carbamates in tobacco by high-performance liquid chromatography/positive electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry, Rapid Communication in Mass Spectrometry, vol.20, pp.529-536, 2006.

K. Ortmayr, V. Charwat, C. Kasper, S. Hann, and G. Koellensperger, Uncertainty budgeting in fold change determination and implications for non-targeted metabolomics studies in model systems, The Analyst, vol.142, issue.1, pp.80-90, 2017.

G. J. Patti, R. Tautenhahn, and G. Siuzdak, Meta-Analysis of Untargeted Metabolomic Data: Combining Results from Multiple Profiling Experiments, Nature Protocols, vol.7, issue.3, pp.508-516, 2013.

D. N. Rutledge and D. Jouan-rimbaud-bouveresse, Corrigendum to "Independent Components Analysis with the JADE algorithm, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.67, 2015.

S. Saito-shida, T. Hamasaka, S. Nemoto, and H. Akiyama, Multiresidue determination of pesticides in tea by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry: Comparison between Orbitrap and time-of-flight mass analyzers, Food Chemistry, vol.256, pp.140-148, 2017.

C. A. Smith, E. J. Want, G. O'maille, R. Abagyan, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS: Processing mass spectrometry data for metabolite profiling using nonlinear peak alignment, matching, and identification, Analytical Chemistry, vol.78, issue.3, pp.779-787, 2006.

R. Tautenhahn, G. J. Patti, D. Rinehart, and G. Siuzdak, XCMS online: A web-based platform to process untargeted metabolomic data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.84, issue.11, pp.5035-5039, 2012.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosén, K. E. Hellenäs, and K. M. Åberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

F. M. Van-der-kloet, I. Bobeldijk, E. R. Verheij, R. H. Jellema, F. M. Kloet et al., Analytical error reduction using single point calibration for accurate and precise metabolomic phenotyping, Journal of Proteome Research, vol.8, issue.11, pp.5132-5141, 2009.

G. , Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes

, Scénario 1 : analyse de contrôle d'un lot de production, et recherche de non-conformités Le premier, regroupant les cas n°1 et n°3, consiste en un produit avec une faible variabilité interéchantillons, dopé à différents niveaux par un mélange de contaminants

, La principale interrogation avant d'aborder cette situation portait sur la proportion de composés dopés que la méthodologie allait permettre d'annoter à l'aveugle. L'étude de ces cas (et particulièrement du cas n°1) a permis de développer des outils opérants en terme d'annotation des composés, avec notamment la construction d'une base données de contaminants et l'adaptation d, Cette situation vise à mimer un cas de non-conformité d'un échantillon (dépassement de la teneur maximale réglementée)

. Kunzelmann, Cette situation est celle étudiée dans la littérature par plusieurs auteurs, soit avec divers niveaux de dopage, 2016.

, Comme précédemment indiqué, l'étude qui nous parait la plus pertinente pour comparer et discuter nos résultats est celle de Kunzelman et al., où plusieurs niveaux de dopage, vol.25, p.400

, Le taux d'annotation obtenu par notre méthode dans ce cas est de 66%, ce qui est un peu plus faible que le taux obtenu dès 25 µg/kg par Kunzelman et al. Au vu de la diversité des composés chimiques testés dans notre cas, ce taux est satisfaisant, d'autant qu'une investigation plus poussée permet d'identifier l'origine des pertes d'informations au cours du processus (voir Figure 6.2.a). Ainsi, 3 composés sont perdus par manque de sensibilité de la méthode analytique (ce qui est attendu eu égard à la diversité des « traceurs » considérés), et 5 molécules ne sont pas détectées par l'algorithme d'intégration des pics. Cela est cohérent avec les résultats rapportés par Coble (Coble & Fraga, 2014) sur les performances des algorithmes de détection de pics, puisque les auteurs montrent qu'aucun outil existant n'est capable d'extraire la totalité de l'information d'un fichier de données. Par ailleurs, il s'avère que les 5 composés manqués par XCMS sont ceux présentant des rapports signal/bruit médiocres (<10, voire aux alentours de 3), les données provenant du ToF s'avérant très bruitées, µg/kg) d'un mélange de 19 pesticides ont été étudiés. Dans le cas n°1 (Figure 6.1) étudié dans notre travail, la diversité de molécules cibles est plus élevée (4 classes de contaminants provenant de plus de 15 familles chimiques différentes), et le produit d'étude plus complexe chimiquement (thé vs. lait pasteurisé UHT), 2015.

, Premièrement cette étude a été réalisée en aveugle, l'analyse des données se faisant sans aucune connaissance de la composition des échantillons et des molécules dopées « inconnues » de la méthode analytique. Le plus haut niveau de dopage investigué dans ce cas est 30 µg/kg (vs. 100 µg/kg dans le cas n°1). Par ailleurs, Chapitre 6 -Discussion générale dopées (3, toutes avec une bonne réponse en LC-MS), nous nous attendions à deux résultats extrêmes, Le cas n°3 est similaire, mais avec des difficultés supplémentaires par rapport au n°1

, L'expérience a donc été conçue avec deux marques de thé vert, et pour chacune un groupe d'échantillons de contrôle et un groupe d'échantillons dopés

, Un essai a également été réalisé en enlevant le groupe d'échantillon dopé d'une des deux marques, et là encore, la contamination a été détectée avec succès. En revanche, en ne considérant qu'un groupe de contrôle d'une marque et le groupe dopé de l'autre, la contamination n'a pas pu être détectée, signe que des études plus poussées sur comment supprimer l, L'avantage de l'utilisation d'ICA apparait dans ce cas car cette méthode permet la séparation de « signaux sources » correspondant à des phénomènes (physiques, chimiques, biologiques) indépendants au sein des échantillons (ici, le dopage et la variabilité naturelle du thé). Les trois contaminants dopés ont été annotés avec succès dans le jeu de données complet

, Scénario 3 : analyse de plusieurs échantillons conformes, diversement contaminés Le dernier type de situation (cas n°4) est caractérisé par la présence de plusieurs contaminations différentes dans les échantillons d'un même jeu de données

, Cette situation vise à reproduire la présence de plusieurs échantillons ayant des contaminations différentes, sans pour autant dépasser les teneurs maximales autorisées. À notre connaissance elle n'a jamais été abordée dans les études existantes

, ToF et Orbitrap) en ce cas, la complémentarité entre l'Orbitrap et le ToF a été plus marquée que pour le cas n°3, puisque plusieurs molécules (5 sur un total de 10 molécules annotées toutes plateformes confondues) n'ont été annotées que dans les données d'une des deux technologies. Ce résultat est cependant à nuancer car il est en partie dû à des problèmes de répétabilité observés pour une séquence donnée (séquence en mode positif sur le ToF) et une suspicion de dégradation des extraits lors de leur stockage ou leur transport (bisphénol S et ochratoxine A sur l'Orbitrap). Cela nous amène donc à deux composés uniques sur l'Orbitrap grâce à une meilleure sensibilité (cycloate et molinate), Cette étude a été effectuée en aveugle, l'analyse des échantillons et des données se faisant sans aucune connaissance du plan de dopage. Par ailleurs nous avons proposé, comme dans le cas n°3, la comparaison de deux plateformes UHPLC-HRMS

, En particulier, deux étapes du prétraitement sont apparues comme sujettes à discussion, avec plusieurs outils et approches existants, pour la plupart inédits dans l'analyse des contaminants de l'aliment. Ces étapes sont l'imputation des valeurs manquantes dans la matrice de données et la filtration des données avant analyse. Plusieurs outils et approches ont été intégrés dans le processus existant, et leur influence sur les résultats finaux (séparation des échantillons contaminés des contrôles et taux de détection des « traceurs ») évaluée. Ces méthodes ont été implémentées sur des jeux de données connues, à savoir ceux utilisés pour le développement de la preuve de concept (cas n°1 et n°2 de la Figure 6.1), puis les outils sélectionnés utilisés en « routine, De nombreux ajustement du procédé de traitement de données utilisé pour la preuve de concept initiale ont été nécessaires pour pouvoir traiter tous ces scénarios, et notamment ceux impliquant l'utilisation d'un analyseur Orbitrap

D. Guida, Au vu des résultats, il a été décidé d'implémenter dans le processus de traitement des données existant une méthode d'imputation des valeurs manquantes basée sur la classification de ces dernières en plus de celle initiale afin de gérer d'éventuelles valeurs manquantes laissées par xcms.fillPeaks sous forme de zéros. En effet notre processus d'analyse de données comporte des étapes ne tolérant pas les zéros (notamment un passage en log). Enfin, il a été décidé d'implémenter les deux méthodes de filtration évaluées en parallèle. Ces travaux méthodologiques, inspirés de ceux existants dans le domaine de la métabolomique, Les combinaisons respectives de trois méthodes d'imputation des valeurs manquantes (une, utilisée dans la preuve de concept initiale, 2016.

, Par ailleurs, les résultats obtenus pour les cas n°3 et n°4 soulignent l'intérêt de réaliser les analyses sur plusieurs instruments en parallèle, en élargissant la gamme de molécules analysables et augmentant ainsi la probabilité de détection d'éventuels composés non-attendus. L'approche non-ciblée que nous avons développée a montré sa capacité à traiter des données provenant de plateforme différentes

, Tout d'abord, bien que notre approche ait été appliquée avec succès à des jeux d'échantillons assez hétérogènes, il reste indispensable de disposer d'un échantillon de référence non-G.Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire chimique de matrices agro-alimentaires complexes 196 contaminé pour la détection des contaminants. Cette limite est commune à toutes les approches nonciblées rapportées jusqu'à présent, Ces travaux ont aussi permis de mettre en évidence un certain nombre de limites des stratégies nonciblées existantes

, Des essais dans ce sens ont été réalisés au cours de la thèse avec la construction d'une base de données de la composition du thé basée sur la littérature et les bases de données existantes, mais cela n'a pas été concluant. La construction expérimentale d'une telle base de données est d'un très fort intérêt mais constituait des travaux supplémentaires trop importants dans le cadre de cette thèse. Par ailleurs, l'approche actuelle repose sur l'analyse au cours de la même séquence analytique d'un échantillon de référence (c.à.d. connu comme sain) et d'un échantillon suspect (celui dont on veut évaluer la qualité sanitaire). Cette stratégie demande un temps d'analyse important (plusieurs jours par séquence), ce qui peut constituer un obstacle à l'implémentation de ces approches pour les analyses de routine. Un moyen de réduire ce temps d'analyse serait de se passer de l'analyse systématique de l'échantillon de référence grâce à la stratégie de base de données évoquée plus haut. Enfin, pour une réelle évaluation non-ciblée fiable de la qualité sanitaire chimique des produits alimentaires, qui permettrait ainsi d'exclure ces derniers de l'analyse des données. Cette base de données inclurait en particulier les composés possédant une très grande variabilité en fonction de divers paramètres

G. Hrms,

J. P. Antignac, F. Courant, G. Pinel, E. Bichon, F. Monteau et al., Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics applied to the chemical safety of food, TrAC -Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.30, issue.2, pp.292-301, 2011.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01928687

R. Cariou, E. Omer, A. Léon, G. Dervilly-pinel, and B. Le-bizec, Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high Chapitre 6 -Discussion générale 197 resolution mass spectrometry profiling, Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.936, pp.130-138, 2016.

M. Castro-puyana, R. Pérez-míguez, L. Montero, and M. Herrero, Application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approaches for food safety, quality and traceability, TrACTrends in Analytical Chemistry, vol.93, pp.102-118, 2017.

J. B. Coble and C. G. Fraga, Comparative evaluation of preprocessing freeware on chromatography/mass spectrometry data for signature discovery, Journal of Chromatography A, vol.1358, pp.155-164, 2014.

J. Cotton, F. Leroux, S. Broudin, M. Marie, B. Corman et al., Highresolution mass spectrometry associated with data mining tools for the detection of pollutants and chemical characterization of honey samples, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.62, issue.46, pp.11335-11345, 2014.
URL : https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01664193

R. Di-guida, J. Engel, J. W. Allwood, R. J. Weber, M. R. Jones et al., Non-targeted UHPLC-MS metabolomic data processing methods: a comparative investigation of normalisation, missing value imputation, transformation and scaling, Metabolomics, issue.5, p.12, 2016.

K. Inoue, C. Tanada, T. Sakamoto, H. Tsutsui, T. Akiba et al., Metabolomics approach of infant formula for the evaluation of contamination and degradation using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, Food Chemistry, vol.181, pp.318-324, 2015.

A. M. Knolhoff, J. A. Zweigenbaum, and T. R. Croley, Nontargeted Screening of Food Matrices: Development of a Chemometric Software Strategy to Identify Unknowns in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.7, 2016.

M. Kunzelmann, M. Winter, M. Åberg, K. Hellenäs, and J. Rosén, Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, pp.1-10, 2018.

G. Libiseller, M. Dvorzak, U. Kleb, E. Gander, T. Eisenberg et al., IPO: a tool for automated optimization of XCMS parameters, BMC Bioinformatics, vol.16, issue.1, 2015.

C. Roullier, Y. Guitton, M. Valery, S. Amand, S. Prado et al., Automated Detection of Natural Halogenated Compounds from LC-MS ProfilesApplication to the Isolation of Bioactive Chlorinated Compounds from Marine-Derived Fungi, Analytical Chemistry, vol.88, issue.18, pp.9143-9150, 2016.

E. Tengstrand, J. Rosén, K. E. Hellenäs, and K. M. Åberg, A concept study on non-targeted screening for chemical contaminants in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with a metabolomics approach, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, vol.405, issue.4, pp.1237-1243, 2013.

. Dans-le, Quelles performances (en termes de sensibilité et d'exhaustivité) des approches non-ciblées, notamment dans des situations de contamination complexes ? Quelle méthodologie pour adapter les outils de traitement de données de la métabolomique à la détection non-ciblée de contaminants alimentaires ? Quelle robustesse de ces approches vis-à-vis des technologies LC-HRMS employées et des scénarios de contaminations étudiés ? En premier lieu, une méthode analytique adaptée aux exigences propres à cette thématique (sensibilité, facilité d'implémentation, répétabilité) a été mise en place et validée par des essais de dopage/recouvrement. Elle repose sur un traitement de l'échantillon générique par solvant (mélange ACN/MeOH acidifié avec 0,1% d'acide formique) suivi d'une analyse par UHPLC-HRMS utilisant une phase stationnaire relativement innovante (silice greffée C18-PFP), et dans une moindre mesure d'infusion. Les trois questions centrales auxquelles nous avons essayé d'apporter des éléments de réponse sont

, Du point de vue du traitement de données, elle repose sur l'utilisation de la suite d'outils XCMS opérée sur la plateforme W4M pour l'extraction G.Delaporte -Développement d'une approche non-ciblée par empreinte pour caractériser la, µg/kg) et les 32 mêmes composés, avec un analyseur de type « ToF