The study of neuronal noise correlations during cognitive flexibility and their phramacological regulation by Norepinephrine

Abstract : Optimal behavior is the result of interactions between neurons, called noise correlation, both within and across brain areas. Noise correlations play an important role in attention, memory, perception and decision-making. Many studies have shown that noise correlations decrease in the process of learning and to correlate with overt behavioral performance, higher noise correlations predicting behavioral failures. Identifying how these neuronal interactions adjust to the ongoing behavioral demand is key to understand the neuronal processes and computations underlying optimal behavior. These neuronal processes depend on tightly controlled activity in brainstem neurons that release neuromodulators at their target sites. Understanding the link between neuromodulation and the variation of noise correlation within brain region would help to describe mechanisms by which neuromodulator exerts its effect. My thesis aims to investigate how noise correlations is adjusted to cognitive and task engagement both in healthy brain state and in brain suffer from attention deficit. To do so, I combined pharmacology, behavioral and electrophysiology in non-human primate. Overall, we show that noise correlations decrease across tasks as cognitive engagement and task demands increase. Specifically, noradrenergic modulation induce a local effect by decreasing noise correlations within networks
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Sameh Ben Hadj Hassen. The study of neuronal noise correlations during cognitive flexibility and their phramacological regulation by Norepinephrine. Neuroscience. Université de Lyon, 2019. English. ⟨NNT : 2019LYSE1049⟩. ⟨tel-02183663⟩

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