Computational method and neuromorphic processor design applied to event-based sensors

Abstract : Studying how our nervous system and sensory mechanisms work lead to the creation of event-driven sensors. These sensors follow the same principles as our eyes or ears for example. This Ph.D. focuses on the search for bio-inspired low power methods enabling processing data from this new kind of sensor. Contrary to legacy sensors, our retina and cochlea only react to the perceived activity in the sensory environment. The artificial “retina” and “cochlea” implementations we call dynamic sensors provide streams of events comparable to neural spikes. The quantity of data transmitted is closely linked to the presented activity, which decreases the redundancy in the output data. Moreover, not being forced to follow a frame-rate, the created events provide increased timing resolution. This bio-inspired support to convey data lead to the development of algorithms enabling visual tracking or speaker recognition or localization at the auditory level, and neuromorphic computing environment implementation. The work we present rely on these new ideas to create new processing solutions. More precisely, the applications and hardware developed rely on temporal coding of the data in the spike stream provided by the sensors.
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Thomas Mesquida. Computational method and neuromorphic processor design applied to event-based sensors. Micro and nanotechnologies/Microelectronics. Université Grenoble Alpes, 2018. English. ⟨NNT : 2018GREAT117⟩. ⟨tel-02171792⟩

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