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Association du statut en vitamine B12 et Folates avec les manifestations du syndrome métabolique liées à l’obésité morbide

Abstract : Obesity, is global health problem, is associated with comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic cardiomyopathy etc. Their incidence and development may be the result of gene-environment interactions. In the last years, the experimental and clinical studies have shown the involvement of methyl donors in these pathologies via « fetal programming ». Our work has evaluated the role of methyl donor on metabolic profile in obese subjects, and also in an animal model of pups with a deficiency of methyl donors, subject to high-fat diet in adulthood. In humans, we have demonstrated that vitamin B12 deficiency associated with excess in folates, is linked to insulin resistance. Also the methyl donors have an influence on fatty acid metabolism. In animals, we have shown that deficiency of methyl donors causes systemic hypertension and cardiac fibrosis, especially in females. In contrast, the males methyl donor deficient with a high fat diet had an important steatosis. In conclusion, the methyl donor shortage is associated with chronic degenerative diseases.
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Zhen Li. Association du statut en vitamine B12 et Folates avec les manifestations du syndrome métabolique liées à l’obésité morbide. Alimentation et Nutrition. Université de Lorraine, 2016. Français. ⟨NNT : 2016LORR0185⟩. ⟨tel-01976957⟩

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