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Mouvement et dissipation dans une cavité gravitationnelle pour atomes de césium

Abstract : In the first part of the thesis, we study the motion of atoms in a gravitational cavity. The central element of this cavity is the atomic mirror, formed by an evanescent wave propagating at the surface of a prism of glass. We investigate the expected properties of the mirror and we discuss the losses related to spontaneous emission during the bounce. We then present and analyse our experimental results. In the second part of the thesis, we investigate both theoretically and experimentally an elementary Sisyphus process occuring during the reflection of an atom onto the mirror. This atom may undergo a spontaneous Raman transition between its two hyperfine levels, which leads to an efficient cooling. This cooling allows us to observe very long lifetime in our gravitational cavity. In the third part of the thesis, we investigate theoretically a trap formed by two laser evanescent waves, which confine the atoms in a Morse potential along the direction perpendicular to the prism. We consider a loading process of this trap based on the Sisyphus process previously exposed. We show that it is possible to achieve in this way an efficient loading of the ground state of the Morse potential, and to get thus a quasi bi-dimensional atomic gas at the surface of the dielectric. We then briefly discuss the quantum statistical properties of this gas at very low temperature.
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Submitted on : Friday, March 10, 2006 - 9:02:40 AM
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  • HAL Id : tel-00011906, version 1

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Pierre Desbiolles. Mouvement et dissipation dans une cavité gravitationnelle pour atomes de césium. Physique Atomique [physics.atom-ph]. Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris VI, 1996. Français. ⟨tel-00011906⟩

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